mineralogasm:

Celadonite and Heulandite from Pato Branco, Paraná, Brazil

mineralogasm:

Celadonite and Heulandite from Pato Branco, Paraná, Brazil

buggirl:

Crested forest toad, genus Rhinella, that we found for the herpetologists’ research in Yasuni, Ecuador.  We loved him so much for the short time we were working with him, that we named him Winston. 
My research in Ecuador

buggirl:

Crested forest toad, genus Rhinella, that we found for the herpetologists’ research in Yasuni, Ecuador.  We loved him so much for the short time we were working with him, that we named him Winston. 

My research in Ecuador

(via sciencealert)

fromgrapevine:

9 of the world’s most extreme lakes
Check out the biggest, deepest saltiest and all-around strangest bodies of water from around the globe.

(via mothernaturenetwork)

mistress-of-science:

Distillation!

mistress-of-science:

Distillation!

streeter:

I am a historian and this is how it happened.

streeter:

I am a historian and this is how it happened.

(via cracked)

mothernaturenetwork:

Scientists get first glimpse into workings of Higgs boson particlesWhat role do the Higgs bosons play in scattering and sticking to atoms?

mothernaturenetwork:

Scientists get first glimpse into workings of Higgs boson particles
What role do the Higgs bosons play in scattering and sticking to atoms?

theenergyissue:

The Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) Building is the First Fully Algae-Powered Architecture

Operating successfully for over a year, the Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) building in Hamburg, Germany is the first to be fully powered by algae. The building is covered with 0.78-inch thick panels—200 square meters in total—filled with algae from the Elbe River and pumped full of carbon dioxide and nutrients. The panels, which display the bright green algae, are not only aesthetic, but performative. When sunlight hits the “bioreactor” panels, photosynthesis causes the microorganisms to multiply and give off heat. The warmth is then captured for heating water or storing in saline tanks underground, while algae biomass is harvested and dried. It can either be converted to biogas, or used in secondary pharmaceutical and food products. Residents have no heating bills and the building currently reduces overall energy needs by 50%. 

(via reallymadscientist)

earth-song:

Endangered Species Spotlight: Blue Baby Godzilla?

Located on the tiny island of Grand Cayman off the coast of Cuba are the last remaining Blue Iguanas (Cyclura lewisi). They’re one of the longest living species of lizard with the record being set at 67 years. Unfortunately, there might not be many years left for this breathtakingly blue species unless conservation efforts are put to the forefront.
The fossil record indicates that the Blue Iguana was abundant before European colonization; but fewer than 15 animals remained in the wild by 2003, and this wild population was predicted to become extinct within the first decade of the 21st century. The species’ decline is mainly being driven by predation by feral pets (cats and dogs) and indirectly by the destruction of their natural habitat as fruit farms are converted to pasture for cattle grazing. Since 2004, hundreds of captive-bred animals have been released into a preserve on Grand Cayman run by a partnership headed by the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, in an attempt to save the species. Blue Iguanas reach lengths of up to 5 ft and weigh around 30 lbs. They’re big blue bubbas! 

This massive breeding and release program is being carried out by the Blue Iguana Recovery Program which has become a pivotal ally in the fight to save the Blue Iguana. To make donations, which are the lifeblood of this foundation, please visit their website here

(via gravitationalbeauty)

quantizedconfusion:

Yup, the above clip is actual footage of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. In 1940, gusts of wind managed to sway the bridge at just the right frequency so as to create resonance.
When you hop on a swingset, you make yourself swing higher and higher by using your legs—propelling your body either forward or backward depending on the direction you’re swinging. This shift in the position of your legs happens at a specific point as the swing moves (can you think of it?!) in order to help you swing higher—hitting that point in the cycle is what creates resonance. The frequency required to hit that point every time is called the resonant frequency.
This is the same phenomenon that allows you to tap a basketball that is motionless on the ground, and continue to hit it so as to bounce it higher and higher without stopping. Notice how you can’t just randomly hit the ball and expect it to continue to bounce higher. When you dribble a basketball from the ground to your waist you are dribbling the ball at its resonant frequency. And if you were superhuman, you could continue to dribble the ball at its resonant frequency until the ball collapsed from the force.
Which is exactly that happened to the Tacoma Narrows Bridge!
The Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapsed just months after its opening, and sparked greater research in the aerodynamics and resonance of structures such as bridges and buildings that are greatly affected by wind and weather.

quantizedconfusion:

Yup, the above clip is actual footage of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. In 1940, gusts of wind managed to sway the bridge at just the right frequency so as to create resonance.

When you hop on a swingset, you make yourself swing higher and higher by using your legs—propelling your body either forward or backward depending on the direction you’re swinging. This shift in the position of your legs happens at a specific point as the swing moves (can you think of it?!) in order to help you swing higher—hitting that point in the cycle is what creates resonance. The frequency required to hit that point every time is called the resonant frequency.

This is the same phenomenon that allows you to tap a basketball that is motionless on the ground, and continue to hit it so as to bounce it higher and higher without stopping. Notice how you can’t just randomly hit the ball and expect it to continue to bounce higher. When you dribble a basketball from the ground to your waist you are dribbling the ball at its resonant frequency. And if you were superhuman, you could continue to dribble the ball at its resonant frequency until the ball collapsed from the force.

Which is exactly that happened to the Tacoma Narrows Bridge!

The Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapsed just months after its opening, and sparked greater research in the aerodynamics and resonance of structures such as bridges and buildings that are greatly affected by wind and weather.

(via schrodingersmeower)

Invitation to an Area night club party. The capsule was placed in water and the invitation appeared. Area was open from 1983 to 1987.

(via femtogram)

adi-fitri:

ohgodhesloose:

tastefullyoffensive:

Be careful with your kindness. [x]

This actually has the makings to a great story…

This Spider-Man reboot has a slightly altered origin story.

(via comicsncoolshit)

mindblowingscience:

STRETCHING TURNS CARBYNE INTO AN INSULATOR

Posted by Mike Williams-RiceonJuly 28, 2014
Applying just the right amount of tension to a chain of carbon atoms can turn it from a metallic conductor to an insulator, report researchers.
Stretching the material known as carbyne—a hard-to-make, one-dimensional chain of carbon atoms—by just 3 percent can begin to change its properties in ways that engineers might find useful for mechanically activated nanoscale electronics and optics.
Until recently, carbyne has existed mostly in theory, though experimentalists have made some headway in creating small samples of the finicky material. The carbon chain would theoretically be the strongest material ever, if only someone could make it reliably.
The first-principle calculations by Rice University theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and his coauthors, postdoctoral researcher Vasilii Artyukhov and graduate student Mingjie Liu, show that stretching carbon chains activates the transition from conductor to insulator by widening the material’s band gap.
Band gaps, which free electrons must overcome to complete a circuit, give materials the semiconducting properties that make modern electronics possible.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

STRETCHING TURNS CARBYNE INTO AN INSULATOR

Posted by onJuly 28, 2014

Applying just the right amount of tension to a chain of carbon atoms can turn it from a metallic conductor to an insulator, report researchers.

Stretching the material known as carbyne—a hard-to-make, one-dimensional chain of carbon atoms—by just 3 percent can begin to change its properties in ways that engineers might find useful for mechanically activated nanoscale electronics and optics.

Until recently, carbyne has existed mostly in theory, though experimentalists have made some headway in creating small samples of the finicky material. The carbon chain would theoretically be the strongest material ever, if only someone could make it reliably.

The first-principle calculations by Rice University theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and his coauthors, postdoctoral researcher Vasilii Artyukhov and graduate student Mingjie Liu, show that stretching carbon chains activates the transition from conductor to insulator by widening the material’s band gap.

Band gaps, which free electrons must overcome to complete a circuit, give materials the semiconducting properties that make modern electronics possible.

Continue Reading.