mindblowingscience:

eHow: Solar Panel Physics

Physicist Walter Unglaub explains how solar panels work by converting photons to electricity. Via eHow education.

(via shychemist)

thecraftychemist:

An Experimental Stem Cell Treatment Lead To A Woman Accidentally Growing A Nose On Her Spine

An 18-year-old woman sustained a spinal cord injury that left her legs paralyzed. Three years later, stem cells from her nose were transplanted into the injury site. She developed back pain eight years afterwards, and imaging revealed a mass at the implantation site. The 3-centimeter-long spinal cord mass was mostly nasal tissue and contained large amounts of thick, mucus-like material.


Although the growth wasn’t cancerous, these findings demonstrate just how important safety monitoring is after stem cell treatments and how it should be maintained for years. The team that removed the growth, led by Brian Dlouhy from the University of Iowa, published the surgery results in Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine earlier this month. 



However, not all patients from the initial study had negative results…



In 2010, the Lisbon team reported results from a pilot study where 20 patients with spinal cord injuries received implants of “olfactory mucosal autografts,” small pieces of the nasal lining. All the patients survived, and it seemed movement in several of them had improved.



From source:



AIS (ASIA Impairment Scale) grades improved in 11 of 20 patients, 6 (A → C), 3 (B → C), and 2 (A → B), and declined in 1 (B → A).



Read more

thecraftychemist:

An Experimental Stem Cell Treatment Lead To A Woman Accidentally Growing A Nose On Her Spine
An 18-year-old woman sustained a spinal cord injury that left her legs paralyzed. Three years later, stem cells from her nose were transplanted into the injury site. She developed back pain eight years afterwards, and imaging revealed a mass at the implantation site. The 3-centimeter-long spinal cord mass was mostly nasal tissue and contained large amounts of thick, mucus-like material.
Although the growth wasn’t cancerous, these findings demonstrate just how important safety monitoring is after stem cell treatments and how it should be maintained for years. The team that removed the growth, led by Brian Dlouhy from the University of Iowa, published the surgery results in Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine earlier this month.
However, not all patients from the initial study had negative results…
In 2010, the Lisbon team reported results from a pilot study where 20 patients with spinal cord injuries received implants of “olfactory mucosal autografts,” small pieces of the nasal lining. All the patients survived, and it seemed movement in several of them had improved.
From source:
AIS (ASIA Impairment Scale) grades improved in 11 of 20 patients, 6 (A → C), 3 (B → C), and 2 (A → B), and declined in 1 (B → A).
owlmylove:

badsketchies:

A comic of my current favorite tumblr post in existence.

oH MY GOD. YOU DREW STEVE IRWIN’S VICTORIAN ANCESTOR. PLEASE WAIT WHILE I GOOGLE WHICH STATES I CAN LEGALLY MARRY DRAWINGS IN THIS IS THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER SEEN

owlmylove:

badsketchies:

A comic of my current favorite tumblr post in existence.

oH MY GOD. YOU DREW STEVE IRWIN’S VICTORIAN ANCESTOR. PLEASE WAIT WHILE I GOOGLE WHICH STATES I CAN LEGALLY MARRY DRAWINGS IN THIS IS THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER SEEN

(via biologizeable)

medicalthoughtdump:

Scale of Infectious Dosedef: the AMOUNT of pathogen (ie NUMBER of organisms) required for cause infection in a host.

medicalthoughtdump:

Scale of Infectious Dose
def: the AMOUNT of pathogen (ie NUMBER of organisms) required for cause infection in a host.

(via thecraftychemist)

cracked:

"That’s Doctor Frownbeard McMustardStain to youuuuuuuAAAUGH—”
5 Recent Blockbusters That Prove Movies Hate Science

#5. Everything About Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Happens Because of One Lab Full of Terrible Scientists
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes shows us a world where apes have risen to power after humanity was decimated by a horrific virus, two events that can be directly traced back to a single terrible scientist: Frownbeard McMustardStain. Franklin (the obviously inferior name the filmmakers decided to go with for some insane reason), a lab technician/monkey expert, winds up becoming patient zero to the destruction of mankind when no one bothers to follow standard quarantine procedure after he is obviously contaminated during an experiment.

Read More

cracked:

"That’s Doctor Frownbeard McMustardStain to youuuuuuuAAAUGH—”

5 Recent Blockbusters That Prove Movies Hate Science

#5. Everything About Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Happens Because of One Lab Full of Terrible Scientists

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes shows us a world where apes have risen to power after humanity was decimated by a horrific virus, two events that can be directly traced back to a single terrible scientist: Frownbeard McMustardStain. Franklin (the obviously inferior name the filmmakers decided to go with for some insane reason), a lab technician/monkey expert, winds up becoming patient zero to the destruction of mankind when no one bothers to follow standard quarantine procedure after he is obviously contaminated during an experiment.

Read More

curiosamathematica:

How to generate a fractal using an IFS (iterated function system).

curiosamathematica:

How to generate a fractal using an IFS (iterated function system).

(via house-of-gnar)

thezartorialist:

single exposure taken from manhattan bridge. glass prism held in front of lens. excerpt from photo series project.
(featured on #landscape)

thezartorialist:

single exposure taken from manhattan bridge. glass prism held in front of lens. excerpt from photo series project.

(featured on #landscape)

(via gravitationalbeauty)

prostheticknowledge:

Kepler’s Dream

Project by Michael Burk is an analogue projection device to intimately view 3D printed objects  - video embedded below:

Kepler’s Dream is an aesthetical investigation, exploring analog projection technology in the combination with computationally created content that is given a physical shape through 3D printing.

Inspired by obsolete projection technologies like the overhead projector, and especially the episcope, an installation was designed that generates unique imagery and a fascinating experience.
Mixing digital aesthetics - parametric and generative shapes - with the qualities of analog projection creates an otherworldly look that seems to be neither digital nor analog.
Interacting with the installation creates a deeply immersive effect, as the instant reaction of the projection and the “infinite frame rate“ let this fantastical world come to life.

More Here

(via house-of-gnar)

mindblowingscience:

China Plans Supercollider

For decades, Europe and the United States have led the way when it comes to high-energy particle colliders. But a proposal by China that is quietly gathering momentum has raised the possibility that the country could soon position itself at the forefront of particle physics.

Scientists at the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing, working with international collaborators, are planning to build a ‘Higgs factory’ by 2028 — a 52-kilometer underground ring that would smash together electrons and positrons. Collisions of these fundamental particles would allow the Higgs boson to be studied with greater precision than at the much smaller Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Europe’s particle-physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland.

Physicists say that the proposed $3-billion machine is within technological grasp and is considered conservative in scope and cost. But China hopes that it would also be a stepping stone to a next-generation collider — a super proton–proton collider — in the same tunnel.

European and US teams have both shown interest in building their own super collider (see Nature 503, 177; 2013), but the huge amount of research needed before such a machine could be built means that the earliest date either can aim for is 2035. China would like to build its electron–positron collider in the meantime, unaided by international funding if needs be, and follow it up as fast as technologically possible with the super proton collider. Because only one super collider is likely to be built, China’s momentum puts it firmly in the driving seat.

Continue Reading.

maikevierkant:

Space Foxes (because space animals are fun).

maikevierkant:

Space Foxes (because space animals are fun).

(via biologizeable)

neurosciencestuff:

This is Your Brain on Drugs
Funded by a $1 million award from the Keck Foundation, biomedical researchers at UCSB will strive to find out who could be more vulnerable to addiction
We’ve all heard the term “addictive personality,” and many of us know individuals who are consistently more likely to take the extra drink or pill that puts them over the edge. But the specific balance of neurochemicals in the brain that spurs him or her to overdo it is still something of a mystery.
“There’s not really a lot we know about specific molecules that are linked to vulnerability to addiction,” said Tod Kippin, a neuroscientist at UC Santa Barbara who studies cocaine addiction. In a general sense, it is understood that animals — humans included — take substances to derive that pleasurable rush of dopamine, the neurochemical linked with the reward center of the brain. But, according to Kippin, that dopamine rush underlies virtually any type of reward animals seek, including the kinds of urges we need to have in order to survive or propagate, such as food, sex or water. Therefore, therapies that deal with that reward system have not been particularly successful in treating addiction.
However, thanks to a collaboration between UCSB researchers Kippin; Tom Soh, professor of mechanical engineering and of materials; and Kevin Plaxco, professor of chemistry and biochemistry — and funding from a $1 million grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation — the neurochemistry of addiction could become a lot less mysterious and a lot more specific. Their study, “Continuous, Real-Time Measurement of Psychoactive Molecules in the Brain,” could, in time, lead to more effective therapies for those who are particularly inclined toward addictive behaviors.
“The main purpose is to try to identify individuals that would be vulnerable to drug addiction based on their initial neurochemistry,” said Kippin. “The idea is that if we can identify phenotypes — observable characteristics — that are vulnerable to addiction and then understand how drugs change the neurochemistry related to that phenotype, we’ll be in a better position to develop therapeutics to help people with that addiction.”
To identify these addiction-prone neurochemical profiles, the researchers will rely on technology they recently developed, a biosensor that can track the concentration of specific molecules in vivo, in real time. One early incarnation of this device was called MEDIC (Microfluidic Electrochemical Detector for In vivo Concentrations). Through artificial DNA strands called aptamers, MEDIC could indicate the concentration of target molecules in the bloodstream. 
“Specifically, the DNA molecules are modified so that when they bind their specific target molecule they begin to transfer electrons to an underlying electrode, producing an easily measurable current,” said Plaxco. Prior to the Keck award, the team had shown that this technology could be used to measure specific drugs continuously and in real time in blood drawn from a subject via a catheter. With Keck funding, “the team is hoping to make the leap to measurements performed directly in vivo. That is, directly in the brains of test subjects,” said Plaxco.
For this study, the technology would be modified for use in the brain tissue of awake, ambulatory animals, whose neurochemical profiles would be measured continuously and in real time. The subjects would then be allowed to self-dose with cocaine, while the levels of the drug in their brain are monitored. Also monitored are concomitant changes in the animal’s neurochemistry or drug-seeking (or other) behaviors.
“The key aspect of it is understanding the timing of the neurochemical release,” said Kippin. “What are the changes in neurochemistry that causes the animals to take the drug versus those that immediately follow consumption of the drug?”
Among techniques for achieving this goal, a single existing technology allows scientists to monitor more than one target molecule at a time (e.g., a drug, a metabolite, and a neurotransmitter). However, Kippin noted, it provides an average of one data point about every 20 minutes, which is far slower than the time course of drug-taking behaviors and much less than the sub-second timescale over which the brain responds to drugs. With the implantable biosensor the team has proposed, it would be possible not only to track how the concentration of neurochemicals shift in relation to addictive behavior in real time, but also to simultaneously monitor the concentrations of several different molecules.
“One of our hypotheses about what makes someone vulnerable to addiction is the metabolism of a drug to other active molecules so that they may end up with a more powerful, more rewarding pharmacological state than someone with a different metabolic profile,” Kippin said. “It’s not enough to understand the levels of the compound that is administered; we have to understand all the other compounds that are produced and how they’re working together.”
The implantable biosensor technology also has the potential to go beyond cocaine and shed light on addictions to other substances such as methamphetamines or alcohol. It also could explore behavioral impulses behind obesity, or investigate how memory works, which could lead to further understanding of diseases such as Alzheimers.

neurosciencestuff:

This is Your Brain on Drugs

Funded by a $1 million award from the Keck Foundation, biomedical researchers at UCSB will strive to find out who could be more vulnerable to addiction

We’ve all heard the term “addictive personality,” and many of us know individuals who are consistently more likely to take the extra drink or pill that puts them over the edge. But the specific balance of neurochemicals in the brain that spurs him or her to overdo it is still something of a mystery.

“There’s not really a lot we know about specific molecules that are linked to vulnerability to addiction,” said Tod Kippin, a neuroscientist at UC Santa Barbara who studies cocaine addiction. In a general sense, it is understood that animals — humans included — take substances to derive that pleasurable rush of dopamine, the neurochemical linked with the reward center of the brain. But, according to Kippin, that dopamine rush underlies virtually any type of reward animals seek, including the kinds of urges we need to have in order to survive or propagate, such as food, sex or water. Therefore, therapies that deal with that reward system have not been particularly successful in treating addiction.

However, thanks to a collaboration between UCSB researchers Kippin; Tom Soh, professor of mechanical engineering and of materials; and Kevin Plaxco, professor of chemistry and biochemistry — and funding from a $1 million grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation — the neurochemistry of addiction could become a lot less mysterious and a lot more specific. Their study, “Continuous, Real-Time Measurement of Psychoactive Molecules in the Brain,” could, in time, lead to more effective therapies for those who are particularly inclined toward addictive behaviors.

“The main purpose is to try to identify individuals that would be vulnerable to drug addiction based on their initial neurochemistry,” said Kippin. “The idea is that if we can identify phenotypes — observable characteristics — that are vulnerable to addiction and then understand how drugs change the neurochemistry related to that phenotype, we’ll be in a better position to develop therapeutics to help people with that addiction.”

To identify these addiction-prone neurochemical profiles, the researchers will rely on technology they recently developed, a biosensor that can track the concentration of specific molecules in vivo, in real time. One early incarnation of this device was called MEDIC (Microfluidic Electrochemical Detector for In vivo Concentrations). Through artificial DNA strands called aptamers, MEDIC could indicate the concentration of target molecules in the bloodstream. 

“Specifically, the DNA molecules are modified so that when they bind their specific target molecule they begin to transfer electrons to an underlying electrode, producing an easily measurable current,” said Plaxco. Prior to the Keck award, the team had shown that this technology could be used to measure specific drugs continuously and in real time in blood drawn from a subject via a catheter. With Keck funding, “the team is hoping to make the leap to measurements performed directly in vivo. That is, directly in the brains of test subjects,” said Plaxco.

For this study, the technology would be modified for use in the brain tissue of awake, ambulatory animals, whose neurochemical profiles would be measured continuously and in real time. The subjects would then be allowed to self-dose with cocaine, while the levels of the drug in their brain are monitored. Also monitored are concomitant changes in the animal’s neurochemistry or drug-seeking (or other) behaviors.

“The key aspect of it is understanding the timing of the neurochemical release,” said Kippin. “What are the changes in neurochemistry that causes the animals to take the drug versus those that immediately follow consumption of the drug?”

Among techniques for achieving this goal, a single existing technology allows scientists to monitor more than one target molecule at a time (e.g., a drug, a metabolite, and a neurotransmitter). However, Kippin noted, it provides an average of one data point about every 20 minutes, which is far slower than the time course of drug-taking behaviors and much less than the sub-second timescale over which the brain responds to drugs. With the implantable biosensor the team has proposed, it would be possible not only to track how the concentration of neurochemicals shift in relation to addictive behavior in real time, but also to simultaneously monitor the concentrations of several different molecules.

“One of our hypotheses about what makes someone vulnerable to addiction is the metabolism of a drug to other active molecules so that they may end up with a more powerful, more rewarding pharmacological state than someone with a different metabolic profile,” Kippin said. “It’s not enough to understand the levels of the compound that is administered; we have to understand all the other compounds that are produced and how they’re working together.”

The implantable biosensor technology also has the potential to go beyond cocaine and shed light on addictions to other substances such as methamphetamines or alcohol. It also could explore behavioral impulses behind obesity, or investigate how memory works, which could lead to further understanding of diseases such as Alzheimers.

xysciences:

Coral branches retreating to protect themselves.
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

Coral branches retreating to protect themselves.

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

(via scientistsarepeopletoo)

photography-amused:

itscourtoon:

walkergirl95:

Wrong Door

THIS IS MY FAVORITE THING ON THE INTERNET 

whoever made this-you’re genious hahah 

photography-amused:

itscourtoon:

walkergirl95:

Wrong Door

THIS IS MY FAVORITE THING ON THE INTERNET 

whoever made this-you’re genious hahah 

(via chemistrynerd11)